State Information

Surveillance Summaries / Vol. 63 / No. 2

The MMWR series of publications is published by the Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Suggested Citation: [Author names; first three, then et al., if more than six.] [Title]. MMWR 2014;63(No. SS-#):[inclusive page numbers].

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6302.pdf

 

2010 State Autism Profiles
KENTUCKY

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DEMOGRAPHICS

In 2000, 1,032 or 1.09% of children ages 3-21 who received special education services in Kentucky have autism. In 2008-2009, 3,143 or 2.92% of children with disabilities ages 3-21 who received special education services have autism.

Table 1-1: IDEA Part B – Children with Autism in Kentucky for 1999-2000 and 2008-2009
(Child Count by Age Group)

Child Count in 1999-2000

Child Count in 2008-2009

Age 3-5

 168

379

Age 6-11

 638

1,526

Age 12-17

 199

1,101

Age 18-21

 27

137

Age 6-21

 864

2,764

Age 3-21

 1,032

3,143

Source: Reported by the State of Kentucky in accordance with Section 618 of IDEA to U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs

Table 1-2: IDEA Part B – Children with Disabilities in Kentucky for 1999-2000 and 2008-2009
(Child Count by Age Group)

Child Count in 1999-2000

Child Count in 2008-2009

Age 3-5

 16,372

19,755

Age 6-11

 42,030

48,321

Age 12-17

32,858

356,648

Age 18-21

3,312

4,008

Age 6-21

 78.200

87,977

Age 3-21

 94,572

107,732

Source: Reported by the State of Kentucky in accordance with Section 618 of IDEA to U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs

STATE TASK FORCE

Kentucky Commission on Autism Spectrum Disorders
The Kentucky Commission on Autism Spectrum Disorders was established by H.B. 296, which was signed into law by Governor Ernie Fletcher in 2005. The commission met for a year to review and assess the training, treatment and services for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. The commission prepared a state plan with recommendations to the Governor, the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Legislative Research Commission on October 1, 2006 and dissolved on October 1, 2007. Rep. Scott W. Brinkman (R-Louisville) served as the chair. Upon dissolution of the commission, a subcommittee was appointed by the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities to monitor the implementation of the state plan. The subcommittee, under H.B. 296, prepares an annual report on the status of the state plan to the Governor and Legislative Research Commission until 2015. A copy of the state plan and 2009 annual update on the state plan may be found on the Kentucky Council on Developmental Disabilities’ Web site.
http://chfs.ky.gov/kcdd/HB+296+KY+Commission+on+Autism+Spectrum+Disorders.htm
http://chfs.ky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/9E302793-5CAB-46EE-AD79-DDE2FEA21F21/228264/HB296annual10093rd.pdf

STATE INSURANCE COVERAGE

January 5, 2010, the Autism Insurance Bill SB 13 was introduced into the state senate by Senator Ray S. Jones II. It was referred to the Senate Committee on Appropriations and Revenue. At the same time, House Bill 159 was introduced into the house by Representative Jeff Greer. This bill was then referred to the House Banking and Insurance Committee. HB 159 passed unanimously within the committee, the House, and finally the senate. On April 14, 2010, Governor Beshear signed the bill into law. The law requires health insurance companies to provide coverage and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. The maximum annual benefit for people between the ages of one and six is $50,000. For people between seven and twenty-one, a maximum monthly benefit is $1,000. Additionally, health insurance companies are required to provide coverage of habilitative/rehabilitative care, pharmacy care, psychiatric care, psychological care and therapeutic care.

EDUCATION

The Kentucky Department of Education developed a training manual, the “Technical Assistance Manual on Autism for Kentucky Schools,” for instructors of students with autism. The manual provides an overview of autism spectrum disorders and the support systems that instructors, staff, and school administrators may offer to students with autism, including the development of the student’s individualized education plan. Legislation has been proposed that includes a requirement for the Kentucky Department of Education to update the manual. The legislation has not passed.
http://www.education.ky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/39BCCC1C-5E01-4CE3-B98B-D55D9287FD75/0/autismmanual.doc

Autism Scholarship Program
H.B. 219 was introduced on February 3, 2009 to establish an autism scholarship program to allow a student with autism to attend a school outside of the resident school district. Eligible students must meet the definition of autism as defined in the Kentucky Revised Statutes. The scholarship is awarded in an amount determined by the Kentucky Department of Education. The maximum award is 100% of the “per pupil funding base” and corresponding add-on funds for an exceptional child allotted under the Support Education Excellence in Kentucky. The bill was referred to the House Education Committee. No further action was taken.

EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

Kentucky Autism Training Center and 10th Annual Autism Institute
The Kentucky Autism Training Center (KATC) was created under legislation that was signed into law in 1996 to provide resources, information, training and technical assistance to individuals with autism and their families, service providers, and educators. KATC is administered by the University of Louisville College of Education and Human Development in partnership with the Department of Special Education and Bingham Child Guidance Center. KATC also sponsors an annual autism institute. http://louisville.edu/education/kyautismtraining

OTHER STATE RESOURCES

H.B. 504 was introduced to require screening for autism spectrum disorders in children at ages 18 months, three years, and upon enrollment in school. The bill was referred to the Health and Welfare Committee. No further action was taken.

STATE LEGISLATIVE CALENDAR

The Kentucky Legislature meets for thirty days in odd-numbered years that is divided into two sessions. The first session begins on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January, and the second session on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in February. The 2010 Regular Session convened January 5, 2010 and adjourned April 15, 2010.
http://www.lrc.ky.gov/

SPONSORS OF AUTISM LEGISLATION

  • Sen. Damon Thayer (R-Georgetown) District 17
  • Sen. Tom Buford (R-Nicholasville) District 22
  • Sen. Ray S. Jones II (D-Pikeville) District 31
  • Sen. Denise Harper Angel (D-Louisville) District 35
  • Sen. Dan “Malano” Seum (R-Fairdale) District 38
  • Rep. Dwight D. Butler (R-Harned) District 18
  • Rep. Thomas J. Burch (D-Louisville) District 30
  • Rep. Scott W. Brinkman (R-Louisville) District 32
  • Rep. Joseph M. Fischer (R-Ft. Thomas) District 68


Prepared by Easter Seals, Inc.; September 2010.


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